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Showing posts from May, 2009

The Literary Context Essay Part 6

"Challenging Louise Gluck, Failing,
and Finding My Own Style in “Meadowsweet, Koi Kokoro”

The Literary Context Essay Part 1
The Literary Context Essay Part 2
The Literary Context Essay Part 3
The Literary Context Essay Part 4
The Literary Context Essay Part 5

I had formed the theme of my poem from Louise Gluck’s four sources of inspiration (dreams, images, ideas, and conflicts). That particular story came from my grandfather’s collection of personal writings that were found when my family cleaned his room after his death last November. This one story inspired me and I finished writing this poem by pulling other material from my four sources. My Japanese connections make my poems different from Gluck’s; however, they can become weak points if western readers do not find universal connections, something that Gluck’s material worked better with. In addition, “The early spring stars are painted with seventeen strokes” is a figurative reference to the failure of love or harmfulness of i…

The Literary Context Essay Part 5

"Challenging Louise Gluck, Failing,
and Finding My Own Style in “Meadowsweet, Koi Kokoro”

The Literary Context Essay Part 1
The Literary Context Essay Part 2
The Literary Context Essay Part 3
The Literary Context Essay Part 4

***
Leaving more Japanese identity, I also adapted one experience I had with my grandmother, who is a professional calligrapher. She always said that calligraphy should be written in a single stroke because with the thin paper and special ink used, audiences will easily see double strokes and corrections in the work that detract from its value. In addition, a professional calligrapher makes her own consistency of ink (for example, she would use lighter, more diluted ink for a funeral letter and a darker, deeper ink for a congratulatory letter). My grandmother prohibits her students from writing important letters with ink before its consistency has been tested because the resulting hue may not be appropriate. As a miraculous consensus, the calligraphy process i…

Break from Thesis Project

Aaron brought a nameless purple flower from a parking lot near the South Bend Airport.

The Literary Context Essay Part 4

I would like to post what I am actually doing for my thesis project...

"Challenging Louise Gluck, Failing,
and Finding My Own Style in “Meadowsweet, Koi Kokoro”


The Literary Context Essay Part 1
The Literary Context Essay Part 2
The Literary Context Essay Part 3

***

“Meadowsweet, Koi Kokoro (the first version)” is my first attempt at applying Gluck’s formula for my own writing. Only I can write about personal experiences of listening to my grandparents who survived through World War II, the atomic bomb in Hiroshima, and extreme poverty after the war in China. In addition, I grew up in the industrial city of Nagoya, close to Kyoto. With the exception of Nagoya’s Tokugawa Museum, they city’s culture revolves around almost entirely industrial developments. So, unlike Kyoto, the premier site for Japanese art and history, or even Tokyo and Osaka, Nagoya has limited access to plays or art exhibitions that normally tour Japan. Therefore, my mother often took me to Kyoto to see Japanese t…

The Literary Context Essay Part 3

I would like to share what I am actually doing for my thesis project...

"Challenging Louise Gluck, Failing,
and Finding My Own Style in “Meadowsweet, Koi Kokoro”

The Literary Context Essay Part 1
The Literary Context Essay Part 2

***
Gluck understands that the possibility of conflicting interpretations can generate some ambiguity in her poems, but she also knows that where there is conflict, there is a more energized engagement with the material. So, in that light, she enjoys laying the grounds for a multitude of interpretations, even conflicting ones, as she believes it creates deeper dramatic poetry after she carefully follows her four-step writing process.
In her essay book, Proofs and Theories, Gluck explains her process and how she chooses which images to invoke based upon a deeper understanding of their seemingly inherent biases held by readers. She wrote,

"I cultivated a capacity to study images and patterns of speech, to see, as objectively as possible, that ideas they e…

The Literary Context Essay Part 2

I would like to share with you what I am writing for my thesis project..."Challenging Louise Gluck, Failing,
and Finding My Own Style in “Meadowsweet, Koi Kokoro”

This essay continues fromThe Literary Context Essay Part 1:

***

In a collection of Gluck’s poems, The House on Marchland, “All Hallows” is a good example to show how she utilizes Christian mythologies in her work. The poem has imagery of agriculture/ harvest, motherhood, and birth, which brings a happy but struggling biological process.


All Hallows

Even now this landscape is assembling.
The hills darken. The oxen
Sleep in their blue yoke,
the fields having been
picked clean, the sheaves
bound evenly and piled at the roadside
among cinquefoil, as the toothed moon rises:

This is the barrenness
of harvest or pestilence.
And the wife leaning out the window
with her hand extended, as in payment,
and the seeds
distinct, gold, calling
Come here
Come here, little one

And the soul creeps out of the tree.


The words such as “seeds,” “gold,” a…

The Literary Context Essay Part 1

Challenging Louise Gluck, Failing,
and Finding My Own Style in “Meadowsweet, Koi Kokoro”

Sinking Garden (a tentative title) will be the culmination of three years of poetry writing. This poetry is analogous with my growth in America after an upbringing in a very distant culture, Japan. This maturation is best shown through writing, which has been the centerpiece of my stay here as my studies have granted me a degree in English and set course for another one. While the contrast of cultures is what differentiates the focus of the work from other poets, it is the findings of my journey that reveal universal characteristics between them. It is these characteristics, represented through common, family based themes that provide relevance of the work to its readers. Three years has seen many developments, both in writing, and understanding of these universals, and the book Sinking Garden explores those findings in a collection of poetry. Within the body of works are different styles. S…
Original art containing illustration of the names of contributing artists & writers and cover photograph from 2009 Analecta have been given to Amy Pfifferling-Irons and Glenn Lyvers.
IU South Bend Graduation 2009
M.A. in English

I would like to thank you; my parents, family, and friends. My family was unfortunetly could not join the ceremoney this time; however, I am deeply moved my heart by people who cheered me during the commencement.
I recently created an art blog ,"WHITE THINGS." The blog title is named after a short story about my favorite white things, which is written in 2007. (The story is available in 2007 Analecta edited by Talia Reed at IU South Bend, English Department.) Of course, I will keep "Word Paint" for my poetry and writing events.

Please welcome to the very white, imperfect blog.

P.S. I will update favorite links as soon as possible. I lost them due to my lacking knowledge of HTML...Oh well.

Summer Art Project

Summer Art Project
White Love Frame by n.f.


I received a generous prize from 2009 Lester M. Wolfson Literary Award, so I decided to see a musical, Merry Poppins, with my proofreader, Amanda G.

Summer Art Project

Summer Art Project
--My Wedding Flower Fund--
Pink Cork Board Designed, Painted, and Constructed by Naoko Fujimoto


"A Pianist," "February," and "Eyelashes, Four" are accepted by Passages North!


A PIANIST

I hear a minuet. My cat sleeps on a couch.
A pianist plays Le Tombeau de Couperin.

Ravel composed it for his friends.
They died in World War I.

She hums the phrase and whispers to me,
“Funerals two thousand times in my country.”

Home: Pieces of blocks
under the soldiers’ boots in her smallest

country, Georgia. No place to return. Refugee:
other people call her. Her cousins went to war.

“Where are the all caskets?” I ask her.

She keeps playing the minuet with a metronome
and its short repeated sound.

All the corpses are hidden under the borderline
like spring water: blood.

A withered gerbera on the piano.

There is no graveyard for prayer.
She cannot cry in front of it.

I say, “I bought a cup of tea and blueberries.”

She huddles the warm
cup and picks up a blueberry. It lightly rolls

down the table to the floor.
The cat plays with a cricket

pulling off its leg.

***

FEBRUARY

I press my forehead …
Analecta Cover Photographer: Ashley Hartsough’s Art Exhibition
IU South Bend Library, 5th floor, May 1 – 31