Sunday, November 23, 2014

David Dodd Lee's "Animalities"


I went to a fabulous party called "Beers Giving". I tasted varieties of craft and local beers-- I have not had many beers since my Belgium trip! It was a wonderfully artistic party meeting college writers/friends and professors; a reunion in a way. 

I was helping the host of "Beers Giving." I even drilled into three pumpkins to make lanterns. I have never carved a pumpkin before, but now I am pretty good at it after three huge pumpkins. I also drew a welcome board for the party in the picture. The quote is from a new poetry book by David Dodd Lee, "Animalities." His actual word was "Soda" but I changed it to "Beer". And I was aware that a coin cannot into a beer bottle... 

I was reading his book on the South Shore Line back to Chicago. There are many favorite poems in the book, but I would like to share one. His book makes my heart sentimental, like drinking lemonade with a little bit of life bitterness. 


THE LESSON 
by David Dodd Lee

The joy cannot continue,
cannot extinguish the fire in

.....the bathtub,
the sirens roving from room to room

in the small house just down the hill
from the seven large houses, candles in

.....every open
doorway. This is how you see in the dark, he says.

and he takes her hand in his hand, her hand
holding a yellow pencil, and he crosses words out.



David Dodd Lee's "Animalities" Available at Four Way Book


Wednesday, November 19, 2014

Ogura Adaptation Poetry Project - LUNCH TIME ATLAS

LUNCH TIME ATLAS
Inspired by the twelfth waka from Ogura Hyakunin Issuhu

I say, “Take my hand,” 
on a perfect day to climb up to the November clouds. 
My flat shoes fell off but we must reach the cracked sky.   
I look into his gray eyes and my mouth moves, “Almost.” 

When a microwave beeps in the lunch room,
he stands up and passes me down the stairs.    
Only his sandwich’s crumbs are spread on the table.  

Today is the forty seventh day—

 I could not say, “Do you like fried rice?”

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Ogura Adaptation Poetry Project - HIS HIDDEN HOUSE

HIS HIDDEN HOUSE
Inspired by the eighth waka from Ogura Hyakunin Isshu

He hides in a mountain South East of Kyoto; 
without visitors and girlfriends, he paints words after words
and studies stories from nameless foreign cities. 

Once he wrote me, “What do you know about love?”

All summer long, I think of his meaning
when I wash my face and look at my wet cheeks in the mirror;
when I put cold cream on my legs;
when I listen to the radio in the car with the wind blowing.

After parking, I walk up to Mt. Ujiyama. 
At the end of the narrow slope, there is— 
catching my breath— his house.